Tribute to the late musician’s career

By Nick Denton, Sports editorNew York City’s iconic song “Don’t Stop Believin’” is about to make its way back to a concert venue where it was written in the mid-1960s.That’s the message the songwriter, Paul Simon, was hoping to send on Monday night as he gave the first of his planned concerts to a packed…

Published by admin inOctober 8, 2021
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By Nick Denton, Sports editorNew York City’s iconic song “Don’t Stop Believin'” is about to make its way back to a concert venue where it was written in the mid-1960s.

That’s the message the songwriter, Paul Simon, was hoping to send on Monday night as he gave the first of his planned concerts to a packed audience at the Javits Center.

“Don’t stop believing in the good, the bad and the ugly,” he sang in the video.

“The only way to get out of the hell we live in is to believe in the goodness of God and in the power of God.

Don’t stop thinking of God as the savior, the God who is the greatest of all of us.

I’m not a hero, but I’m the best of all you.”

Simon, whose songwriting career spanned decades and sold more than 20 million copies worldwide, died at age 92.

He was the voice behind many of New York City sports teams, including the New York Yankees, the New Jersey Devils and the New England Patriots.

In his own way, the musician was also an inspirational figure for many people in the city.

He was a staunch advocate for the environment, environmental awareness and social justice issues.

His songs helped usher in the New Deal and the Great Society programs and helped establish the Children’s Defense Fund, the first national philanthropic organization.

He also was a prolific performer, including as a founding member of the band the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra and the band The Black Eyed Peas.

Simon died on Monday in New York after a long battle with lung cancer.

His family said in a statement they were grateful for the support of their fans, who included members of the New Yorkers for Simon, who also performed in the Garden in New Orleans.

He died of pneumonia at the University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center.